Cloud9 IDE - Online IDE

Support / FAQ – How can we help you today?

Getting started


Lesson 1: Creating a new account

Creating an account for the Cloud 9 IDE can be done in a few simple steps:

1. First, sign up for an account on the Cloud9 sign-up page, by filling in your desired username and email address and pressing the Sign me up button:

You will then see a message indicating that we have sent you an email to the address you provided with activation instructions:

2. Check your email now. You will receive an email from us with a link to activate the account. Click on the link. You will now be asked to set a password for your new Cloud9 account:

3. Click on Activate.

Congratulations! You are now the proud owner of a Cloud9 account. Now, go ahead and create your first project. Happy coding!




Lesson 2: Creating a new project

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There are various choices to be made when creating a new project in Cloud9 IDE. In this article, I will walk you through the creation of a new project and describe the choices you will encounter.

The first step for creating a new project is to click on the “+” next to My Projects in the Projects tab:

newProject.png

 

At this point, you will encounter two choices: Create a new project and Clone from url. We will explore both paths.

Create a new project

After clicking on Create a new project, you will be presented with the screen shown below:

createNewProjectOptions.png

 

Enter a project name. You will now have three choices for the type of project you wish to create:

  • Git project: will allow you to run git commands from the console and push your changes to Github
  • Mercurial: will allow you to run hg commands form the console and push your changes to Bitbucket.
  • FTP: will allow you to upload your files directly to an FTP server you have access to.

Make a choice for the type of project and press Create. That is all! You will now see your new project in the dashboard:

createdProject.png

 

Now, just click Start Editing to get started!

Clone from url

The second option for creating a new project is to clone one from url. The url would be, for example, the url of a Github project such as:

https://github.com/fjakobs/cloud9-coffeescript-example

Let’s clone this project. When you click on Clone from url you will be greeted by this screen:

cloneProjectOptions.png

 

Paste the Github url in the textbox labeled Source URL. If you have a premium account, you can choose who has access to your project. For regular users, the new project will be public.

Now, checkout the project. It will be created under My Projects. You can now start editing it!

Deleting a project

Now that you know how to create a project, you should also learn how to delete one. Look at the far right side of your dashboard:

deleteProject.png

Clicking on the Delete button will prompt the IDE to ask for confirmation:

deleteConfirmation.png

This is your last chance to change your mind. Once you have typed delete in the textbox and pressed the red button, your project will be gone forever from Cloud9 IDE. If you are sure you want to delete your project, go ahead and press the red button.

 

Congratulations! In this article you have learned how to create (and delete) a project.




Lesson 3: Writing a Node.js Hello World program

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n this article, we’ll walk you through the creation of a simple Hello World program. If you followed our last two lessons, you already have a Cloud9 IDE account and you know how to create a project. To get started with Lesson 3, you’ll need to first create a (Github or Mercurial) project. If you need a refresher on how to do this, please refer to Lesson 2.

A Simple Node.js HTTP Server

Once you have created your project, click on the Start Editing button to go to the Cloud9 IDE editor. In the editor, create a new file called server.js. Type the following code in the file:

var http = require('http');
http.createServer(function (req, res) {
   res.writeHead(200, {'Content-Type': 'text/plain'});
   res.end('Hello World\n');
}).listen(process.env.PORT);

What you just wrote is a Node.js HTTP server that returns a simple ‘Hello World’ page for every request. In short, you are creating an HTTP server with a callback function that is called for each request. In the callback function, you create a response with a status code of 200 (indicating that the request was fulfilled successfully) and the message “Hello World”. Finally, you specify which port the server listens to. When Node.js projects run within Cloud 9 IDE, you can retrieve the port information with process.env.PORT

Running your program

With Cloud9 IDE, you can run your Node.js applications in a test environment and see the results of your coding. To run your “Hello, World” application, click on the run button in the menu bar. In the pop-up window that appears, add a new run configuration as shown in the image below:

newRunConfiguration.png

In this run configuration, called “server,” the file that is executed is your “Hello World” application, which you saved in a file called server.js. Now, press Run. Your application will be deployed to one of our servers, and you will immediately see some output similar to the one below:

RunOutput.png

To see your application in action, click on the link created for your project. You should see your “Hello World” application open up in a new browser tab:

helloWorld.png

To stop your application, go back to the editor and click on the stop button (next to the run button).

Congratulations! You have just written and run a node.js application in Cloud 9 IDE!

FAQ


What is Cloud9 IDE?

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Cloud 9 IDE is, at its core, an online code editor. Specifically, it’s an IDE for Javascript that uses Node.js as a backend. Cloud 9 IDE supports the ability to import projects from GitHub, Bitbucket, and FTP, collaborative development, and syntax highlight for a variety of languages. It’s simple, fast, and extremely powerful, with tabbed file browsing, autocompletion of methods and properties, searching across project files, and many other features you’d expect from a terrific editor.

Since Cloud 9 IDE runs on Javascript, you can build, debug, and run Node.js applications within your browser. You can run npm and import packages developed by the Node.js community. Cloud9 IDE can also instantaneously deploy your projects to production servers hosted by Heroku and Nodester in order to take your awesome ideas to a wider audience.

Cloud 9 IDE is completely free to use for open source projects. If you want to develop under a private (and collaborative) environment, you can pay a low monthly fee.




How can I delete my account?

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You don’t want to use Cloud9 IDE any longer or just want to remove an account. You can find the ‘delete your account’ option under your account settings within the dashboard.

1. Go to ‘My Account’

2. Click ‘Delete your Account’ from within your account settings

3. Please give us feedback. Any information to improve the product is useful.




My ftp project does not work. Am I doing something wrong?

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First of all make sure you read the article about setting up an FTP project.

Secondly, be aware that we only support passive FTP. No passive FTP, SFTP or FTPS.

Also, please make sure you succeed the login test when creating a project. If you didn’t try it when creating the project, just click in “FTP settings” (next to Start Editing) in the dashboard. In the pop up window, you can do the login test again:

Another possible problem is a wrong “Initial Path”. Did you set the “Initial Path” in the FTP project? If so, could you not set it? Some users seem to be having problems with it when the path they put doesn’t exist or is a relative path. This is not a bug, but a misunderstanding of absolute vs relative paths. If you put a relative path (that is, if the initial path does not start with a /), then Cloud9 assumes that you want to start from the folder your FTP server leaves you after login (home or default folder). If you put an initial path that leaves you in a location where you don’t have write privileges, that could cause problems too.




I have just signed up for Cloud9 IDE and my username got duplicated, how could this happen?

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You have just signed up for a Cloud9 IDE account and now you have two usersnames: username and username_1.

This happens in the following use case:

1. You signed up for Cloud9 IDE following the registration form on our homepage

This created an account with your username, for example anonymous

2. You signed up for Cloud9 IDE using your GitHub account (by clicking on the GitHub icon on the home page)

This created an second account, but because your username (from GitHub) is already in use, we adjusted it to: anonymous_1.

To link your first account with your original username to your GitHub account you should remove the second account.

You can do so by logging in to Cloud9 IDE using the GitHub (clink on the GitHub icon in the log in screen).

Next, find the ‘delete your account’ under your account settings within the dashboard and delete the username_1 account.

Finally, log in to your original account using your username (or email address) and password and you can link to GitHub.




Console commands do not work. Why?

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Before submitting a support request about the console not working, please consider this:

1. Are you behing a proxy/firewall? It is possible that it might be blocking our xhr polling. If you can use Cloud9 IDE at home, but cannot get it to work properly while at the office, this might be the cause.

2. Are you running an anti-virus? The anti-virus software might be blocking some requests. Lately, we have experienced this issue with Avast anti-virus. For some users, disabling this software was enough to get Cloud9 IDE to work properly again. For others, uninstalling Avast was necessary. We are working on finding a solution for this.

If neither of these applies to you, please file a support request and we will look more deeply into your problem.




I try to activate github access: “Another account is already linked to Github account ‘username’”

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You have created multiple accounts. Click here to see how to solve this issue.

Troubleshooting


Cloning Git repository from BitBucket

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Since October, 2011, BitBucket provides Git support. However, as of this writing Cloud9 IDE assumes that any repository that you want to clone from BitBucket is a Mercurial repository. As a result, if you have a Git repository in BitBucket and try to clone to edit this project from the dashboard, the cloning will fail.

You can get around this problem easily by fixing the url that Cloud9 IDE generates when you attempt to clone. When cloning a BitBucket repository, Cloud9 IDE uses a source url like the following:

ssh://hg@bitbucket.org/username/repositoryname 

To clone a Git repository from BitBucket, change the url to look like this:

git@bitbucket.org:username/repositoryname.git

Notice the following differences:

We have removed ssh://
We have changed hg to git
We have added .git at the end of the url
Now, you should be able to clone your git repository from BitBucket.

General Features


‘Those little things…’ (part I)

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You may recognise the experience: having a device for some time already, using it to great satisfaction and suddenly, half a year later, you discover that it has a killer feature that you wish to have known before. This is a good time to have a look at the nifty little features in Cloud9 IDE that not all users know about, but can save a lot of time and annoyances. Let’s have a look at some key bindings that appear in the help menu in the IDE (Menu ‘Help’ -> ‘Keyboard Shortcuts’). They are listed on our documents site as well: Key bindings.

Isn’t it the little things that make life beautiful?

(more…)




New Collaboration: Real-time Editing, Chat and File Revision History

back to top

Today we introduce a complete new version of the Cloud9 Collaboration features! Built from the ground up we’ve made them more reliable, granular, and faster, while introducing some nifty new features such as File Revision History Timeslider that we think will really enhance your productivity.

Collaborative Features:

  • Real-time Collaborative Editing and selections (with authorship info colors).
  • Group Chat (messages and user events).
  • File Revision History (with authorship info colors).

generic_collaboration

Read on for what’s new.

(more…)




Can I use Cloud9 to do X?

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When talking to our users we often hear: “I like the concept of Cloud9 but can I use it to do X?”. In this context X could stand for things like programming languages, database servers, frameworks, build tools and much more. The diversity of things people do with Cloud9 still amazes us. Fortunately we can almost always answer: “Yes you can certainly use Cloud9 to do X”.

(more…)




About the Project Bar

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The project bar is the leftmost content area in the Cloud 9 IDE. It controls the behavior of your IDE, as well as the presentation of your code to help you design in the style you like:

Screen_Shot_2011-11-16_at_11.40.10_AM.png

By default, the Project Files window is enabled. This button toggles whether or not your entire project is visibile.

The Active Files button lists all the files that are open in your editor.

Preferences is where the magic happens. These configuration options change the behavior of the editor. Here’s what they mean:

General
  • On Load, restore previous state: when you close the editor and log back in, this option will restore all your previous active files
  • Save all files before running: when you choose to Run your application, this option will save all open files before running

JS Beautify

These options control the behavior of the code formatting tool found in Edit | Beautify Selection.

  • Preserve empty lines: if enabled, the editor keeps any new lines without text
  • Keep array indention: when checked, tabs and newlines in arrays are preserved. For example, the follow array would remain as-is with this option:
    var o = [{
        a: b
    }, {
        c: d
    }];
  • JSLint Strict Whitespace: if selected, all new scopes lines are indented by four spaces
  • Braces: there are three options here:
    • Braces with control statement: braces are left “in-line” alongside the code statements. For example, code is formatted like this:
      if (true) {
          var x = 3;
      } else {
          var x = 5;
      }
    • Braces on own line: braces are always placed on their own line. For example, code is formatted like this:
      if (true)
      {
          var x = 3;
      } else
      {
          var x = 5;
      }
    • End braces on own line: only the ending braces have their own line. For example, code is formatted like this:
      if (true) {
          var x = 3;
      }
      else {
          var x = 5;
      }

Code Editor

  • Auto pair characters: when enabled, typing “, (,  or [ will actually make two characters appear. In addition, whenever you highlight a word and type one of these characters, it is surrounded by that character (e.g. words becomes “words”)
  • Overwrite mode: similar to the insert key on your keyboard, any characters you type overwrite the ones that come after it
  • Full Line Selection: when highlighting lines, this option will highlight all ending whitespace, until the end of the editor window
  • Highlight Active Line: presents a colored background to indicate which line you’re currently on
  • Show Invisibles: shows invisibles characters in the editor, like spaces, tabs, and line breaks
  • Show Gutter: shows the gutter in the editor, which indicates line numbers, warnings, and errors
  • Highlight Selected Word: when this is enabled, and if you highlight a word, this will highlight all matching words in the editor
  • Auto-hide Horizontal Scroll: when this is enabled, this will hide the horizontal scroll bar in the editor. Note that this has no effect in Mac OS X 10.7 (Lion), since all scrollbars, by default, auto-hide.
  • Font Size: changes the font size of the code in the editor
  • Show print margin: shows (and defines) the number of characters possible in line, before it wraps
  • Soft tabs: indicates how many spaces a single tab represents
  • Mouse Scroll speed: defines the speed of the mouse scrolls
  • Strip Whitespace On Save: when saving a file, this will remove all extraneous whitespace from your code lines

Note: all of these options are on a per-project basis. Changing them in one project does not affect any another.




File Handling

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Cloud9 IDE provides the usual file handling features you have come to expect from an IDE. Let’s take a look at the File menu and explore the options:

FileMenu.png

 

The Revert to Saved option allows you to revert your file to its last saved version.

The Save functions (Save, Save As and Save All) allow you to:

  • save the file you are currently working on (Save)
  • save your current file with a different name and/or in a different location (Save As …) and
  • save all your open file (Save All)

As you might expect, the Open Recent option allows you to reopen you recently closed files from a menu.

The New functions (New File, New from Template and New Folder) also offer the expected functionality, with New from Template presenting you with a menu with several options of file template to choose from.

You can see Cloud9 IDE’s file handling functionality in action in the following video.




Tab Functionality

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Cloud9 offers advanced tab features to make working with multiple open files easy. These feature include:

  • Reordering tabs by dragging horizontally
  • Adding a new tab with Alt+Shift+n
  • Switching between two tabs by pressing Alt+Tab
  • Cycling through your tabs by pressing Tab multiple times while holding the Alt key.

See these features in action in the following video:

How to...


‘Those little things…’ (part I)

back to top

You may recognise the experience: having a device for some time already, using it to great satisfaction and suddenly, half a year later, you discover that it has a killer feature that you wish to have known before. This is a good time to have a look at the nifty little features in Cloud9 IDE that not all users know about, but can save a lot of time and annoyances. Let’s have a look at some key bindings that appear in the help menu in the IDE (Menu ‘Help’ -> ‘Keyboard Shortcuts’). They are listed on our documents site as well: Key bindings.

Isn’t it the little things that make life beautiful?

(more…)




Can I use Cloud9 to do X?

back to top

When talking to our users we often hear: “I like the concept of Cloud9 but can I use it to do X?”. In this context X could stand for things like programming languages, database servers, frameworks, build tools and much more. The diversity of things people do with Cloud9 still amazes us. Fortunately we can almost always answer: “Yes you can certainly use Cloud9 to do X”.

(more…)




MySQL for every workspace

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Adding direct support for MySQL is one of the most requested features for Cloud9. In the past we were directing users who wanted to use MySQL to database hosting services like xeround. That was a bit inconvenient and in addition they are now discontinuing their free tier.

(more…)




Deploy your application to Heroku

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This article will explain to you how to deploy your applications to Heroku. Heroku is cloud based application platform for easy deployment of your applications. The integration with Cloud9 IDE makes your development process even more agile. Please, continue to read this article if you already have an account. Otherwise go to the Heroku Homepage to create one for free.

Also, you can watch a demo of the feature when it was released here.

Heroku Deployment

To get started we use a simple NodeJS application, which is explained in this article.

IMPORTANT: Before you attempt to deploy your application, please make sure that you have committed all your changes to version control. Cloud9 will deply for you whatever has been committed to version control. For example, with git on the command line you would type:

git add .
git commit -m "Committing the latest version of my app"

Once your latest changes have been committed, you can continue to deploy your application.

The deployment option is placed at the bottom of the project bar, which is located on the left.

Screen_Shot_2011-12-12_at_17.30.40.png

From there you can press the plus sign (+) next to Deploy to add another deploy target. When you choose Heroku as the type of deployment an option to sign in to Heroku appears (see images below). After you have signed in to your Heroku account you can create a new deploy target or choose an existing one from your account.

Note: Heroku only allows you to create names for your apps that contain uppercase, lowercase and dashes.

Screen_Shot_2011-12-12_at_17.36.34.png   Screen_Shot_2011-12-12_at_17.44.37.png   Screen_Shot_2011-12-12_at_16.51.59.png

Now you have added a deploy target, which you can use to deploy your application to. Next, you can press Deploy to continue the process and the following window will pop-up.

Screen_Shot_2011-12-12_at_16.53.01.png

We can generate a package.json file for you, which contains the metadata that contains information to share with Heroku. The following lines are added to the file:

{
  "name": "cloud9-heroku-example",
  "version": "0.0.1"
}

Screen_Shot_2011-12-12_at_16.53.19.png

The Procfile is needed to start the application in Heroku. You can just create a new file, add the line below, and save it as ‘Procfile’. (do not add any file extensions)

web: node web.js

Try the deploy button again. The console will directly output the following when the deployment is completed:

Screen_Shot_2011-12-12_at_16.59.21.png

In only view simple steps your application has been deployed to Heroku!




Push your (git) Cloud9 project to Bitbucket

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In this article, I will explain the steps you have to take to push a Cloud9 IDE project to a source code hosting site like Bitbucket. For this article, I’m assuming that you have created a git project in Cloud9. Let’s see how you can push this project to Bitbucket.

First, if you haven’t done so already, create a Bitbucket account. Then, follow these steps:

  1. Go to your Cloud9 dashboard. Click on Your Account  and, under Account Settings, click on Show your SSH key and copy the key.sshKey.png.
  2. In Bitbucket, go to Account Settings and then click on SSH Keys (https://bitbucket.org/account/#ssh-keys). Paste the Cloud9 SSH key into the textbox. Then, click “Add key”.
  3. Create a git repository on Bitbucket. At the top, you will see: “Clone this repository (size: … bytes): HTTPS/SSH”. Click on SSH. Then, underneath it will show a URL of the form git@bitbucket.org:username/reponame.git. Copy this URL.cloneBitbucket.png
  4. Go to your Cloud9 project. If you created it as a git project, git is already setup. If you haven’t already, commit any changes using the console:
    • git add .
    • git commit -a -m “My first commit”
  5. Then, add a new remote repository from the Cloud9 console:
    • git remote add origin <git url you copied>
    • For instance:
    • git remote add origin git@bitbucket.org:username/repository_name.git
  6. Then, you can push to this repository:
    • git push origin master

Your project is now pushed to bitbucket.




Create a CoffeeScript / Node.js Project

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In this article you’ll learn how to create a Hello World Coffeescript application.

Before you continue with this example, you can either create the projects and files that are shared in this example manually; or, you can clone it from GitHub using the following command:

git clone git://github.com/fjakobs/cloud9-coffeescript-example.git

To learn how to clone a GitHub repository, read this article.

A Simple CoffeeScript App in Cloud9 IDE

After cloning the project, you’ll find three different files in the tree: server.jsapp.coffee, and README.md.

The README.md file contains instructions to install coffee-script using the Node Package Manager. We integrated Node Package Manager into Cloud 9 IDE to enable users to install Node programs.

From the Cloud 9 IDE command line, type the following command to install the Coffeescript module:

npm install coffee-script

Next, let’s have a look at the server.js file. The first line is the require() function, which is used to load the coffee-script module that you have just installed. On the second line, we declare the CoffeeScript file that contains your application. In the last line, we specify the port the server is listening to. When projects run within Cloud9 IDE, you must retrieve the port information using process.env.PORT.

Now, let’s look at what the CoffeeScript file does. It creates an HTTP server with a function that is called for each request. In the callback function, you create a response with a status code of 200 (indicating that the request was fulfilled successfully) and the message “Hello World”. You use ‘module.exports’ to enable theserver.js file to use the code in the CoffeeScript file.

http = require "http"

module.exports = http.createServer((req, res) ->
    res.writeHead 200, 'Content-Type': 'text/plain'
    res.end 'Hello World\n'
)

Next, run the server.js file and open the URL indicated in the console:

Screen_Shot_2011-11-23_at_17.54.34.png

The result is:

Screen_Shot_2011-11-23_at_17.55.05.png

To stop your application, go back to the editor and click on the stop button (next to the run button).

Congratulations! You have just written and run a CoffeeScript application in Cloud9 IDE!

Projects


WordPress workspace type

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We just launched a new workspace type for the popular CMS software WordPress, which automates downloading and uncompressing WordPress and its database configuration!

After supporting MySQL on Cloud9 hosted workspaces as previously posted in MySQL for every workspace, our users asked for a WordPress workspace type.

(more…)




Setting up an FTP project

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In this article, we show you how to set up an FTP project. Before attempting to create an FTP project, please be aware that Cloud9 IDE currently support only passive FTP. Active FTP, SFTP and FTPS are not supported.

To create an FTP project, do the following: in the Projects tab in the Dashboard, click on the + sign and choose the option to Create a new project (see Lesson 2 if you need to review the steps to create a new project.) In the pop-up window that appears, select FTP for the project type:

FTPoptions.png

Let’s review the options available for your FTP project:

  • Hostname: the domain address or IP address of the machine running your FTP server.
  • Username: your username for the FTP server.
  • Password: your password for the FTP server.
  • Initial path: this is an optional parameter. You can set it as an absolute (starts with /) or relative path (does not start with /). If you do not set it or set it as a relative path, Cloud9 IDE assumes that you want to start from the folder your FTP server leaves you after login (home or default folder). Please be careful not to put an initial path that leaves you in a location where you don’t have write privileges as that could cause problems.

Fill in your FTP details and click the Login Test to verify that the settings are correct. If the test succeeds, go ahead and press Create to create your FTP project. You will then see your project in the Dashboard under My Projects:

newFtpProject.png

When your new FTP project is selected, you will see three buttons: Start EditingFTP settings and Delete (on your far right). FTP settings gives you access to the settings you just filled in, as well as the login test.

To get started with your FTP project, click on the Start Editing button. You will be taken to the editor. Under Project Files, you should see the files from the FTP server in the directory you selected (either your home/default folder or the location indicated by the Initial Path, if you set it). The editor for FTP projects works the same as in other projects: you can create and edit your files in the usual way. The main difference is the FTP log at the bottom of the page (where the console is usually located for other non-FTP projects).

The FTP log displays output related to the interaction with the FTP server. The screenshot below, for example, shows what happens when I create a new file called TestFile.txt.  The file is created in the FTP server and when I write to it, the contents are transferred.

FTPlog.png

In an FTP project, all files are stored in your FTP server. Cloud9 IDE only stores the FTP settings. Please keep this in mind. Cloud9 IDE does not keep any copies of your files, so make sure you back them up properly.

That is all! Now you can create FTP projects and work on your remote files in Cloud9 IDE.

Signing in


Forgot your password?

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Every now and again we forget our password.

You can get your password reset here – at the top of every page where you would normally sign-in:

and then you can fill in your details.




Resend your confirmation email

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If you tried to sign-up and didn’t receive your activation email for your account. You can get this resent to your email address.

Just go here: http://c9.io/site/resend-confirmation-email/

 

All you need to do is fill in your email address again, and we will resend it.

A top tip is to check your junk mail too just in case it got moved by your email provider.

Tips and Tricks


‘Those little things…’ (part I)

back to top

You may recognise the experience: having a device for some time already, using it to great satisfaction and suddenly, half a year later, you discover that it has a killer feature that you wish to have known before. This is a good time to have a look at the nifty little features in Cloud9 IDE that not all users know about, but can save a lot of time and annoyances. Let’s have a look at some key bindings that appear in the help menu in the IDE (Menu ‘Help’ -> ‘Keyboard Shortcuts’). They are listed on our documents site as well: Key bindings.

Isn’t it the little things that make life beautiful?

(more…)




New Collaboration: Real-time Editing, Chat and File Revision History

back to top

Today we introduce a complete new version of the Cloud9 Collaboration features! Built from the ground up we’ve made them more reliable, granular, and faster, while introducing some nifty new features such as File Revision History Timeslider that we think will really enhance your productivity.

Collaborative Features:

  • Real-time Collaborative Editing and selections (with authorship info colors).
  • Group Chat (messages and user events).
  • File Revision History (with authorship info colors).

generic_collaboration

Read on for what’s new.

(more…)




WordPress workspace type

back to top

We just launched a new workspace type for the popular CMS software WordPress, which automates downloading and uncompressing WordPress and its database configuration!

After supporting MySQL on Cloud9 hosted workspaces as previously posted in MySQL for every workspace, our users asked for a WordPress workspace type.

(more…)




Converting your public projects into private projects

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One of the premium features in Cloud9 is the ability to create private projects. However, after upgrading you might want to turn an existing public project into a private one. At the moment, we don’t have an easy way to turn public Cloud9 projects into private projects.

You can get around this limitation by using a code-hosting site like Github or Bitbucket to push/pull your Cloud9 projects. You can do so by following these steps:

  • Create an account in a code-hosting site that supports private repositories (Bitbucket offers free private repos, so that might be your best option.)
  • Link the account at the code-hosting site with your Cloud9 account (see Add-on Services under Your Account in the Dashboard)
  • Push the public Cloud9 project you want to convert to private to the code-hosting site.
  • Go to the Cloud9 Dashboard and do a “clone from url” with the url from the new private repository at the code-hosting site and select “Only the people I specify (premium feature)”. That would create a new private project from the repository you provide in the url.
  • Delete the old public project in Cloud9.

This article might be helpful (skip steps 1 and 2 if you have already added your Bitbucket account through Add-on Services):
http://support.cloud9ide.com/entries/20754818-push-your-git-cloud9-project-to-bitbucket




Rename a cloned project

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When you clone a project, the project created in your account inherits the name of the original project. At the moment, Cloud9 IDE does not allow users to change the name of a project once it is already created. However, you can get around this problem by cloning a project twice.

Here is how it works: the first clone will inherit the name of the original project. When you clone the project a second time, Cloud9 will notice that another project with the same name already exists (the first clone) and it will ask you to enter a new name. This is your chance to rename the project.

You will be left with two clones: one with the original name and one with your chosen name. Now, you can just delete the first clone and keep the one with the desired project name.




Refresh your (Github/Mercurial) Project List

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The listing of your projects from Github/Mercurial is reloaded whenever you log in through Github/Mercurial (by clicking on either the Github or Mercurial icon). After log-in, the list of project remains unchanged. This means that if you create a new project on Github (outside of Cloud9 IDE), you won’t see the change reflected on Cloud9 IDE until you log in again through Github. Moreover, if you log in again using username/password, you still won’t see your new project listed.

You can get around this with a little-known feature in Cloud9 IDE: reloading your project list by clicking in the Github/Mercurial icon under Add-on Services:

If you linked your Github or Mercurial account to your Cloud9 IDE account, you will see the corresponding icon in color under Add-on Services. Clicking on the icon will reload your project listing!

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